Monthly Archives: September 2016

Want to improve Cell Phone Signal Reception in metal buildings?

The problem is that the metal roof prevents microwaves from being transmitted from the cell phone towers as well as from the cell phones. There is no infallible way to avoid the annoyance of dropped calls, there are technological fixes available that allow for improvement in the reception and transmission of cell phone signals.
An electronics store should be able to sell you a cell phone signal booster and an external antenna. This is the most effective method of treating the problem. You will have to connect power booster to the RF port of the cell phone. The cables should come with the power booster. The power booster will be plugged into an electrical outlet inside the building.
Now, connect your power booster to the external antenna. The store where you bought the booster should carry the cable you need. Now, test it out by making a call. The signal should be at least ten times stronger than before, possibly even stronger.
zBoost YX-510 Cell Phone Signal Booster Dual-Band Unit for Home or Office is one such product that helps in enhancing the signal.
Features include:
Extends cellular coverage for single or multiple users in homes or offices–provides up to 2500 square feet of coverage
Dual-band device works with 800/1900 MHz frequencies from all major carriers–AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, Verizon, Alltel, Cricket, and more (not compatible with Nextel)
Omni-directional signal antenna receives signals from multiple cell towers
Antenna can be installed outdoors above the roofline or indoors in the attic or near a window
Extends phone battery life–uses less power when signal is stronger.

You can full fill all your cellular phone needs with the Wireless Extenders YX510-PCS/CEL zBoost zP Wireless Booster, which works with both cellular frequencies (800 and 1900 MHz) and can extend cellular coverage up to 2500 square feet. This unit can handle signals from all the major U.S. cellular carriers.
zboost_soho-installation
The package includes: amplifier base unit, power supply, base unit antenna, low-loss SATV coaxial cable (RG6), signal antenna and mounting hardware. The omni-directional signal antenna receives signals from multiple cell towers.
Using a revolutionary, patent pending technology that protects the carrier network, the YX510 improves indoor cell phone coverage by capturing and repeating the outside signal, bringing it into the building and enhancing it. This process creates a “Cell Zone” in your home or office.

Distributed Antenna Systems a post modern way to get connected!

A Distributed Antenna System (DAS) includes the use of several antennas as opposed to one antenna to provide wireless coverage to the same area but with reduced total power and additional reliability. Often at times a DAS uses RF directional couplers and/or wireless amplifiers to split and amplify the wireless signal from the source out to the distributed antennas. In many cases a DAS will use a combination of low loss coaxial cabling as well as fiber optic cabling supporting radio over fiber (RoF) technology to distribute the wireless signals to the antennas. A Distributed Antenna System can be designed for use indoors or outdoors and can be used to provide wireless coverage to hotels, subways, airports, hospitals, businesses, roadway tunnels etc. The wireless services typically provided by a DAS include PCS, cellular, Wi-Fi, police, fire, and emergency services.

A wireless communication network employs a distributed antenna system to provide radio coverage. The wireless communication network comprises a plurality of access points providing service in respective coverage areas. The access point within each coverage area connects to a plurality of antennas that are widely distributed within the coverage area. Radio resources at antennas within the overlapping region of two or more neighboring coverage areas are shared by the access points in the neighboring coverage areas according to a multiple access scheme. The sharing of radio resources within the overlapping region of two or more coverage areas allows the overlapping region to be enlarged, thereby providing more time to complete a handover.

A distributed antenna system (DAS) or a distributed radio system (DRS) generally refers to a radio-access architecture comprising a large number of antennas distributed widely across a large coverage area and connected to a centralized Access Point (AP). The radiation coverage of each antenna typically has a much smaller footprint than that of a base-centrally-located antenna/base station in a conventional cellular system. The DAS architecture has two main advantages.

First, it is possible to achieve high spatial re-use capacity due to the small coverage area of each antenna.
Second, the centralized access point has complete control of all the radio resources used at each antenna and can therefore coordinate the transmission and reception of signals to minimize interference in an increased system capacity.
A DAS installation consists of a network of separately installed antenna nodes that are connected to a common source through fiber or coaxial cable. Splitting transmitted power among several antenna elements to cover the same area as a single antenna reduces the total power required and increases the reliability of the signal.
DAS-1
Typically, the antennas in a DAS are connected to the AP through optical fibers. The AP may process the received (uplink) signals from multiple devices using appropriate combining techniques, such as maximum ratio combing (MRC) or interference rejection combining (IRC). On the downlink, the AP may transmit to multiple devices using zero forcing or dirty paper-coding to suppress interference if the forward link channel is known. The AP may also use macro diversity techniques to direct radiation to specific mobile devices if the channel is not known.